Cover ATDF-Journal Embeddedness

 

The term ‘embeddedness’ has been shaped and re-shaped by the research of economic sociologists in the 20th century.

Karl Polanyi initiated the academic debate on embeddedness with the publication of ‘The Great Transformation’ in 1944. His basic argument was that the institutions of embedded traditional economies are being destroyed by a self-regulating market economy in which the market no more serves the needs of the people but rather reversed, that people would have to meet the needs of the market. As a consequence, the expansion of the formal market economy would lead to the disembedding of local economies with ‘catastrophic consequences’ for local communities.

Inside this edition

‘Principled embeddedness’: How Multinational Enterprises contribute to sustainable change by pursuing their long-term self-interest

Philipp Aerni

Sustainable and Future Oriented Cocoa Production in Ghana: Analysis of the Initiatives of two Swiss Chocolate Manufacturers

Tanja Sostizzo

Embeddedness of Chiquita’s Banana Production in Panama: The potential to mitigate social and ecological problems

Constantine Bartel and Veronica Soldati

From Philanthropy to Business: When Transformation Is The Only Way to Stay True to Your Mission

Ulrich Frei and Isabelle Schluep

Potential Sustainability Effects Resulting from Embeddedness: A Case Study of Nestlé Indonesia

Constantine Bartel

Positive Sustainability Effects Resulting from Embeddedness: Evidence from Syngenta’s potato business in Kenya and Colombia

Tanja Sostizzo

Beyond Corporate Social Responsibility –A Human-Centred Approach to Business Ethics in the 21st Century

Marianthe Stavridou and Sumon Vangchuay